Retro Review of “The Blues Brothers”

Lately, there has been a bit of a dearth of films I find myself interested in reviewing in writing, while there are others that I simply have not had the chance to watch yet. In the meantime, let’s revisit a topic I’ve been wanting to discuss for awhile now: what makes a good movie musical, and why The Blues Brothers is a great example of one done correctly.

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Review of “Nomadland”

Nomadland has seen a lot of traction online, perhaps a result of the impact of the pandemic and its effect on the modern theater. With its release on Hulu, I decided to try out the third feature from Chloé Zhao, to see just what the fuss surrounding this film was about. It turns out that it’s not about anything I agree with.

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Review of “Crime Scene: The Vanishing at the Cecil Hotel”

Netflix recently released this documentary mini-series that fell onto my radar by complete happenstance, this time focusing on the strange disappearance of Elisa Lam. Like many crime scene cases that exploded in popularity on the internet, there is a great deal of investigation already done that only seems to have intensified the mystery. Crime Scene: The Vanishing at the Cecil Hotel explores almost none of it in any meaningful way.

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A Brief Road Map to the next Street Fighter Anniversary Collection

It’s been two and a half years since the release of Street Fighter 30th Anniversary Collection, and while it received some positive reviews overall, its distinct features left the community at large somewhat unimpressed. Yes, it was great to have an entire collection of different versions of each series, but the emulation for certain games was questionable (especially at launch) and there are features still missing from certain core titles. So, here’s some ideas on what certain fans (i.e. me) want from the next collection should Capcom release one in 2013.

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Review of “Pieces of a Woman” (2020)

So, I meant to watch this earlier this month when it finally arrived to Netflix, but I was on an extended break from reviewing films after my latest marathon. And then, for a week, buzzers in my building kept me from wanting to watch anything because I could hear them in my apartment. With those issues fixed, I sat down to watch a film I’ve seen receive high praise all over my timeline- and while it certainly deserves some accolades, I’m not convinced it lives up to the numerous 10 out of 10 scores some have given it.

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Breaking Barriers into Fighting Games when you enjoy Action Games

A number of times, I have seen people who are legitimately good and interested in action games and action game series decline to play fighting games because they “aren’t good enough” or “aren’t interested,” under the presumption that there are staggering differences between the two genres. Personally, I think the two genres are much more related than most give credit for until you study the similarities a bit more closely.

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Halloween in December: “The House That Jack Built”

It’s the final day of my Halloween in December movie marathon and, in the theme of self-indulgence I decided to watch The House That Jack Built. From the controversial director Lars von Trier, this film follows the perspective of the serial killer Jack (played by Matt Dillon) as he explores the reasons behind his own cravings to kill. What the audience gets is a two and a half hour long journey into the ego of Lars von Trier- for better and for worse.

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Halloween in December: “Martyrs (2008)”

30 straight days of horror films is what it took to get to this point. And this particular horror film is a doozy- Martyrs (yes, the original one) is a twisted and utterly depraved bit of New French Extremity that retains much of the hallmarks of its contemporaries but then goes far beyond them, perhaps being one of the most metaphorically personal pieces of New French Extremity ever put out.

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Halloween in December: “Funny Games U.S.”

This movie marathon is sadly almost over, so to close out the month, I’m going with less risky ventures and staying with what is more in my wheelhouse. Funny Games U.S. certainly fits into that category, coming from one of my more favorite directors in Michael Haneke and being a shot-for-shot American remake of the original Austrian production. Despite sharing the same rating from me, its advancements keep up with its new flaws, in ways that make me rethink the understanding of the original.

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